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Tuesday, January 25, 2022

For Parents: Talking to Children about the Church Scandal

Editor's note: This content originally appeared in a July/August 2010 special issue of Catholic Digest on the topic of clergy sexual abuse. Find more on this...

5 Tips for Forming Catechists’ Spirituality

DR. LORI DAHLHOFF Nurturing the spirituality of catechists is crucial to providing effective religious education. Daily meditation on Scripture Incorporate guided meditation on Scripture into meetings...

Prayers for #Vocations

Here's a prayer for vocations from among the dozens found at the USCCB website: + Father, we're your people, the work of your hands. So precious are we in...

“THE GOOD” — A BRIEF RECAP FROM HISTORY

BISHOP ROBERT BARRON It’s simply a fact … that the most powerful force for evangelization in the first decades and centuries of the Church’s life...

The Immaculate Conception Explained (video)

This might be a little fast paced for younger students, but Fr. Mike offers background on the theology and understanding of Mary's Immaculate Conception,...

Pep Talks for Catholic Parents: An Introduction

When my husband heard the title of book he thought it was a great idea, until I mentioned who the author was. He...

N.I.C.E. Meets Special Needs

Catechetical leaders and catechists build their parish religious education programs to meet the needs of all children, including those with special needs. The National Directory for Catechesis tells us that “each person with a disability has catechetical needs that the Christian community must recognize and meet. All baptized persons with disabilities have a right to adequate catechesis and deserve the means to develop a relationship with God” (n. 49).

Advice from Master Catechists—September 2012

Your questions, answered by Master Catechists.

Igniting the Fire of Faith

This Year of Faith is an invitation, not a command. It is not a time to complain that the Divine should take a more active role in the world, but that we should “make God credible in this world” (Fisichella). It’s more than being nice or doing one’s duty. It’s going to demand sacrifice, courage, and an enormous amount of energy—but probably not more than the original disciples needed in order to follow the Great Commission. They may have been the first to witness like their hair was on fire.

Teaching Students with Special Needs

BY PAM SCHIFFBAUER Pope Francis has called the Catholic Church to be a welcoming Church. As we welcome our students into our religious education classes,...